Several changes to the system have taken place since its introduction, including:

• The mayor and council manager option has been abolished; (See Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007, schedule 3. The only authority that adopted this system was Stoke-on-Trent. When it was abolished, Stoke held a further referendum, in which the electorate opted for a leader and cabinet instead of a mayor and cabinet system.)

• In England, authorities may now resolve to introduce an elected mayor, whilst in Wales, a referendum is still required; (This change was introduced in part 3 of the Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007.)

• Authorities using the leader and cabinet model must elect their leader for a four-year term; (Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007, s.67)

• Authorities of any population size may reintroduce the committee system if they so choose. Previously, the option of retaining a slimmed-down committee system was restricted to authorities with a population of under 85,000. Authorities may also hold a referendum on moving to a committee system, or simply choose to reintroduce it. Several authorities have since moved from an executive system to the committee system; (Localism Act 2011 schedule 2.)

• Referendums may be held on any change in governance arrangements, not only a move to an elected mayoralty; (For instance, Fylde Borough Council held a referendum in May 2014 on moving to the committee system, following a petition.)

• The length of time that must elapse between referendums in a local authority has been extended from five to ten years. (Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007, section 69)